Unique wall art made by the Swedish designer Robert Lindström. Black Leakage concept includes five motives at the moment. All named after oil tankers that were sent to the bottom during World War II – as a small reminder that out of something bad, something good can come. 


1. USS Neosho, 1938 - 1942

Dimension: Medium: 162 X 115 cm, Large: 282 X 200 cm.

"Medium" size is recommended for apartments and homes. "Large" is recommended for bigger areas, like offices. "Large" is divided into two parts to make it easier to apply on the wall. "Medium" is also divided for US clients because of shipping regulations.

Fate during World War II: The USS Neosho, an oil tanker from United States Navy, plied the oceans for only three years before it was sunk. But during that time they experienced one of the toughest battles of World War II, including the Pearl Harbor attack in 1941 and the Battle of the Coral Sea, where Neosho sunk, May 11, 1942. In this last battle the ship was victim of seven direct hits from the Japanese, including a suicide dive by one of the bombers. One of her crewmen was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his efforts to save the ship. Superb seamanship and skilled damage control work kept the oil tanker afloat for the next four days. 

An American destroyer rescued the 123 survivors and to sink by gunfire the ship they had so valiantly kept alive against impossible odds. USS Neosho received two battle stars for World War II service.

 

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Shipping is included in price (world wide).

Medium: $200, Large: $300

2. SS Montebello, 1921 - 1941

Dimension: Medium: 94 X 105 cm, Large: 170 X 190 cm.

"Medium" size is recommended for apartments and homes. "Large" is recommended for bigger areas, like offices. "Large" is divided into two parts to make it easier to apply on the wall. "Medium" is also divided for US clients because of shipping regulations.

Fate during World War II: The SS Montebello, a Union Oil Company's oil tanker, was torpedoed by a Japanese submarine off the coast of California close to the small seaport of Port San Luis, December 23, 1941. Fortunately, the torpedo hit the only compartment not loaded with gasoline. "The men wouldn't have had a chance if any other hold was hit," said Captain Olaf Eckstrom. "But it did knock out the radio." The crew at Montebello was unarmed, and as the men jumped into lifeboats, the submarine surfaced and fired at them with its deck gun. No one was killed but one of the lifeboats was hit and sank. 

 

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Shipping is included in price (world wide).

Medium: $180, Large: $280

3. Gulfoil, 1912 - 1941

Dimensions: Medium 66 x 89 cm, Large 124 x 167 cm.

"Medium" size is recommended for apartments and homes. "Large" is recommended for bigger areas, like offices. "Large" is divided into two parts to make it easier to apply on the wall. "Medium" is also divided for US clients because of shipping regulations.

Fate during World War II: The German vessel U-506 torpedoed the Gulfoil, an oil tanker from 1912, shortly after leaving Port Arthur, Texas, May 16, 1942.  A first torpedo hit the starboard side and 15 seconds later, a second torpedo struck the engine room, killing the three men on watch below. The crew had no time to launch the boats or to radio for help, when Gulfoil sank less than two minutes after the first torpedo struck. 19 men of 36 managed to leave the ship on two life rafts. 17 men died.

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Shipping is included in price (world wide).

Medium: $140, Large: $210

4. Halo, 1920 - 1942

Dimensions: Medium 120 x 110 cm, Large 213 x 195 cm.

"Medium" size is recommended for apartments and homes. "Large" is recommended for bigger areas, like offices. "Large" is divided into two parts to make it easier to apply on the wall. "Medium" is also divided for US clients because of shipping regulations.

Fate during World War II: The steam tanker Halo, built in 1920 and owned by the Cities Service Oil Company, New York, was torpedoed by the German vessel U-506 about fifty miles from the Southwest Pass of the Mississippi River, May 20, 1942. The first torpedo hit on the starboard side near the bridge and was followed by a second hit close to the bridge.  This part of the ship was reportedly “completely destroyed.” As fire spread across the vessel, it began to plunge down at the bow. The explosions and fire destroyed all four lifeboats and three life rafts.  The crew was able to launch only one partially-burned life raft before flames over took the ship and it sank. Out of a crew of forty-two men, only twenty-three managed to escape, most by just grabbing life vests and jumping overboard. 

 

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Shipping is included in price (world wide).

Large: $280, Medium: $180

5. Gulfpenn, 1921 - 1942

Dimensions: Medium 82 x 105 cm, Large 148 x 190 cm

"Medium" size is recommended for apartments and homes. "Large" is recommended for bigger areas, like offices. "Large" is divided into two parts to make it easier to apply on the wall. "Medium" is also divided for US clients because of shipping regulations.

Fate during World War II: The Gulpenn, an unescorted and unarmed oil tanker from 1921, was torpedoed by the German submarine U-506 on its way to Philadelphia from Port Arthur, Texas, May 13, 1942. The torpedo struck the engine room and killed all of the personnel on duty in that location. The vessel sank stern first and swiftly plunged to the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico. 25 crewmembers survived the attack, but one officer and 11 crewmen died in the explosion or went down with the tanker.

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Shipping is included in price (world wide).

Medium: $180, Large: $280